IT Outsourcing & Open Source Technologies

Global Services magazine published the first article in the series of expert opinion stories by DataArt executives. Simon Cox, Vice President of Open Source at DataArt, takes a look at how Open Source could be a positive move for any business looking to reduce its bottom line while maintaining productivity in the development of a solid finished product.

After clarifying that Open Source does not necessarily mean 'free' software as is often presumed, but source code that is open for review and allows modification by contributors, Cox outlines potential businesses that might be interested in Open Source and discusses its effect on ROI and TOC. “It’s in the arena of back-end servers where Open Source started making real inroads into commercial organizations, quite often without direct approval or knowledge of those in charge. Therefore, a change in the back-end systems is a viable starting point for any business looking to start a relationship with Open Source.”

Cox explains how Open Source works well in outsourcing engagements: “Open Source provides an excellent platform for development in an outsourced environment. Not only do the developers have a platform to work with, they can take a look under the bonnet of the software to see what’s running underneath which can help with development. When using third party libraries, developers can resolve bugs in the third party library themselves instead of logging a support call with the supplier and waiting for a fix to come (if ever).” “DataArt is a multi-skilled company, with developers working in a variety of environments on a multitude of platforms. One developer might be using Visual Studio developing for Windows, and another might writing code in Vi on Linux. Any IT outsourcing business these days needs to work in a multitude of environments and use a variety of tools from both the proprietary world and the Open Source world.”

The article concludes with a list of advantages and disadvantages of outsourcing with Open Source.

View original article